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Author: Kurt Grumelart

  -  Articles posted by Kurt Grumelart

The year 2020 set several new records for financial markets as we witnessed the steepest (although not deepest) equities crash ever recorded alongside peak volatility. The months following the market crash in March, 2020 saw an incredible bounce back with the S&P taking as little as five months to reach new highs. In this time, a record number of new entrants to equity

Brief intro to Bitcoin Bitcoin is widely regarded as the world’s leading cryptocurrency, a type of digital asset that utilises blockchain technology to create a decentralised, transparent and secure monetary network. Released in 2008 as a targeted response to the Global Financial Crisis, Bitcoin’s early-day proponents hoped to develop an asset that could provide a secure and reliable currency, removed from a ‘broken’ centralised

The Macroeconomic Mirage The US and global economies are currently in a unique position. As global debt reaches US$281 trillion with no sign of slowing down, the macroeconomic horizon is becoming more uncertain. In 2020, the federal reserve injected over US$3 trillion and a further US$1.9 trillion is expected in early 2021 under the Biden administration. Consequently, asset devaluation is inevitable. The act has led to

The year 2020 introduced many investors in the world of traditional finance to the potential impact that cryptocurrencies will have in the coming decades. The bull market currently occurring in the digital asset space following the March 2020 crash prompted many to dive deeper into understanding Bitcoin (BTC) and the Ethereum network. With partial regulatory acceptance in key financial centres such as the

As Bitcoin (BTC) sits near its all-time high alongside many crypto assets, global focus is being placed on its value as a tradable store of wealth that has immense value to any individual’s portfolio. While this is one key component of BTC’s value and many digital assets’, alternative uses are flourishing in nations across Africa. A region plagued with misfortune and underdeveloped infrastructure

Central bank interest rates have been present in human civilization for centuries, with the oldest known example in ancient Babylonian society around 2000BC. The moneylender profession was admirable in this time, with interest rates of 25% being commonplace, particularly if precious metals such as gold or silver were on the table. Although, operations were typically small scale and privately run with very few

In March 2020, the Bitcoin (BTC) price took a dive, dropping almost 50% in just a few days. Since then, the cryptocurrency has seen a supply shock unlike any before it. A surge in demand by both retail and institutional investors was expected due to the price discount and increasing faith in the asset’s utility. However, the main driving factor was the increase

The rise of Bitcoin futures. Cryptocurrency derivative markets have seen a huge surge in popularity following the Covid-19 market crash as speculators attempt to capitalise on the volatility in both price and trading volume. In the lead up to this event, the range of markets available was increasing significantly despite mediocre trade volume. Although, following both the bitcoin halving and increased volatility, the

Gold has remained a fundamental piece of culture among humans for thousands of years, although over time its uses have changed drastically. While it has held value to humans for millennia, its first recorded use as a medium of exchange was around 4000BC. From here it progressively became a cornerstone in the assets of individuals, families and even civilizations. Today gold has many

Institutional investment in bitcoin has seen a steady increase over the past decade. While for some, this raises concern for the potential of crowding out retail investors, the opposite is likely to be true. A rise of involvement from institutions has increased market liquidity, price stability and aided in a heightened reputation among governments and regulators.1 Despite this, wide adoption has been stifled